Borsch

There are some foods, as soon as you hear the name, it makes you instantly think of their country of origin, like sushi and Japan or spaghetti and Italy. In the same way, borsch is synonymous with Ukraine.


With the whole world focused on Ukraine right now and their epic battle against the invading Russian army, this seemed the perfect time to write about the national dish of Ukraine.


This rich, beautiful soup represents unity, a dish that promises warmth, comfort, a sense of peace, and ethnic pride.


While reading about the history of borsch, I came across one site that stated, "When Ukrainians cook borsch, they are expressing their patriotism and love for Ukraine"(Ukrainian_recipes.com)


Borsch was first made in Ukraine in the late 17th century and has evolved over the years. Many countries have adopted this dish and have changed it based on regional ingredients and personal tastes.


I read a quote by Tom Birchard that states it perfectly, "there are as many versions of borsch as there are Eastern European grandmas." There is no one right way to make borsch. The way you like it is the right way!


Family recipes with their different ingredients and unique cooking secrets are handed down from generation to generation. However, if there is one common understanding among Ukrainians, it would be that borsch should be so full and dense that your spoon will stand up in the bowl.


Some popular variations of this dish include red borsch, green borsch, and white borsch. (see our blog on green borsch) Red borsch is the most common and is typically served with a dollop of sour cream and garlic buns on the side.


Borsch has been incorporated into many cultures and has become a favorite of the local cuisine of many countries. The spelling of the name and ingredients may change, but the final result is a large pot of beautiful soup that brings people together.


Try it for yourself; it is delicious!


Visit our shop for a free download recipe of red borsch. This recipe is my favorite way to make it. It is a modified recipe handed down from my Ukrainian mother-in-law.


Peace to Ukraine.







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